Posts tagged 6th Street Mural

To The Mattresses!
Marco Zamora’s 6th Street Mural at The Standard, Downtown LA

To The Mattresses!

Marco Zamora’s 6th Street Mural at The Standard, Downtown LA

Simply Sequential 

Artist Erin Garcia walks us through the mathematics behind his current installation at The Standard, Downtown LA.

Mario Wagner’s Interactive 6th Street Mural
Read an interview with the latest artist to takeover the 6th Street Mural in Downtown LA on Standard Culture. 

Mario Wagner’s Interactive 6th Street Mural

Read an interview with the latest artist to takeover the 6th Street Mural in Downtown LA on Standard Culture

John Knuth is the latest 6th Street Mural artist. 
John Knuth, “Faded Siren #2”, 4 1/2 x 3 3/8in, polaroid, 2013

John Knuth is the latest 6th Street Mural artist. 

John Knuth, “Faded Siren #2”, 4 1/2 x 3 3/8in, polaroid, 2013

The Ice Cream Cone man keeps watch on the 6th Street Mural at The Standard, Downtown LA

The Ice Cream Cone man keeps watch on the 6th Street Mural at The Standard, Downtown LA

Buff Monster’s original sketch for his 6th street mural concept…see the mural here!

Buff Monster’s original sketch for his 6th street mural concept…see the mural here!

Buff Monster’s 6th Street Mural

Buff Monster’s 6th Street Mural

Mark Licari’s 6th Street Mural

60 Seconds on Sixth Street from dick thompson on Vimeo.

Changing out the work on the 6th Street Mural at The Standard, Downtown LA, is always a bit of an emotional roller coaster. It’s sad to see the previous work go but painting over it to create a fresh new canvas gives us a sense of excitement about what’s coming next.

(Mark’s work in progress)

Last week we had a mean case of the butterflies as Mark Licari was out on the sidewalk for three days creating our latest featured artwork. We love the frenetic energy that’s evident throughout his work and knew that his piece, designed specifically for the mural space, would attract tons of attention from passersby.

He did not disappoint.

(Mark Licari’s finished mural)

Between brush strokes, Mark answered our questions about his process, inspiration and LA as an influence.

The Standard: So much of your work seems to incorporate motion, along with elements of chaos and disintegration. What are these components meant to communicate?

Mark Licari: I see this dripping, cracking, rusting and perpetual motion all around and have yet to really understand it.  There is obviously some kind of science behind it but I believe there is definitely some art behind it too.  These elements in my work mostly communicate in the form of questions, rather than converging on answers. But could also be as simple as appreciating a sort of energy or beat to things that is mirrored in the work. 

How does being an LA-based artist contribute to themes that show up in your work?

Los Angeles is a land of mismatched hubcaps, rats peering down at you from the tops of palm trees, and swarms of loud screeching parrots.  It ”never rains” but when it does, every ceiling leaks.  Despite all the potholes everyone gets along with a very wide range of acceptable driving skills. This is somehow interesting to me. 

Does creating a site specific piece like your work for the 6th Street Mural have further influence?

Certainly for me it will.  The experience of making art is cumulative so each project helps to influence the next one in different ways.  However, to measure the influence on other people and the surroundings we would need a team of experts, a box of legal pads and no. 2 pencils, and a lot of erasers.  

(The mural, ready for its close-up) 

You work in a variety of media… are there things that are easier to express in sculpture vs. a drawing or print and vice versa?

For me the work starts with drawing as kind of the first step and this leads to other materials, however the different modes of working all relate to and influence each other.  So at a certain point it is not about what is easier so much as just where the path of thinking leads me.  But this path is more like a messy web spun by a spider on caffeine rather than a linear thought process. 

What’s coming next for you? What are you looking forward to in the rest of 2011?

Two site specific mural projects, one at Disjecta in Portland in December this year and one at MOCA Jacksonville in March 2012.  This year I am also working on a new lithograph at Hamilton Press in Venice. 

Where else can we see your work?

I currently have a show up at Cueto Project in New York through September 10th. My gallery here in Los Angeles is Honor Fraser. My website is marklicari.org

Skullphone Strikes Again

THE STANDARD x SKULLPHONE from Tyler Kindred on Vimeo.

The name Skullphone is basically eponymous with LA street art. And while he’s best known for the now iconic image of a skeleton on a cell phone we love the evolving direction of Skullphone’s work. Last week he took over both The 6th Street Mural at The Standard, Downtown LA and The Box at The Standard, Hollywood with two different digitally inspired pointillism installations. 

(Skullphone’s Box Installation)

At the end of the month, we’ll celebrate with the man behind the moniker at The Standard, Hollywood. Stay tuned for details! Skullphone put down the cellular for a few seconds to tell us about the past, present and future of his work.

Team Skullphone puts finishing touches on the 6th Street Mural.

The Standard: Tell us where Skullphone comes from and what the name/work represents.

Skullphone: Skullphone is an image I started posting around Los Angeles in 1999. As a frame of reference I was called “the guy who puts up that skull on cell phone image”, which I eventually condensed to my moniker “Skullphone.” Interpretations of this rudimentary image are left up to viewers regarding technology, social systems and every day sort of stuff.  

You work in a variety of media, is there one you go to more frequently? How is each unique?

My time is now spent hand painting thousands of dots on aluminum panels. These pieces are made to intrigue within an indoor setting the same way outdoor art impacts commuters.

I still use standard tools for outdoor work: stencils, posters, etc. The two worlds are linked with outdoor imagery working its way into the dots and the dots now working their way outdoors.  

(Pirates? Nope, it’s Skullphone)

Do you have a favorite piece or project you’ve worked on?

The digital billboards in Los Angeles back in 2008 impacted my current trip the most - it bridged me over to painting RGB dot patterns. I also enjoy the text messages every December when the hollow glass Skullphone baubles hang on Christmas trees. They have an insane craftsmanship since they were produced at the original glass ornament factory in Poland. They’re very fragile. (Note: a very limited quantity of Skullphone’s ornaments will be available for purchase at The Shop at The Standard, Downtown. Run don’t walk!)

How do you approach projects like the mural at The Standard, DTLA and the vitrine at The Standard, Hollywood differently?

The downtown mural is made for people walking and driving past it, so it’s not necessarily made to be seen from a direct view. The Hollywood Vitrine piece is visible from far away but falls apart as it is approached. When standing at the reception desk it hopefully will be abstract nothingness. Of course the Hollywood vitrine will also have a Digital LED with information overload. Welcome to The Standard, Hollywood…  

We see your work all over LA – where else can we find Skullphone?

Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Flickr, SocialCam, Google Suites, Myspace, Bebo, Friendster, Zorpia, Netlog, Habo, Yahoo Messenger, Live Profile, Convore, Postman, LiveShare, FreeSpeach, Crowdstory, Ditto, hi5, Groupie, Honestly Now and Skullphone.com.  


Ryan McGinness is lovin’ himself a little LA

Ryan McGinness has been visiting Los Angeles and the palm trees and constant sunshine seem to be suiting him just fine, not that he’s had much time to enjoy them. In the past week and a half he’s had two art openings and set up elaborate installations at both The Standard, Hollywood and The Standard, Downtown LA

Here are some of the photo highlights: 

(Ryan putting the final touches on The Vitrine at The Standard, Hollywood)

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